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Category Archives: RV Safety


Potential signs of mice include chewed-through dry goods and trails of debris.

Rodents Entered RV While in Storage

We all think little Frederick and his little mouse family that live in the wall all winter are adorable, but we’re not so excited when the little mice have made their winter home in our RV.  How can you tell if you’ve been hosting these little rodent guests all winter?  Here are 3 signs you may have a rodent problem as you pull your RV out of storage to get ready for Spring travels.

  1. Made the mistake of keeping dry goods in the pantry?  Look here first for signs of nibbling on pasta boxes and even eating through packets of creamer and sugar.  If you left it in there, they found it.
  2. Is there an unusually foul smell?  This is likely a dead rodent who made and nest, enjoyed a comfortable stay, and then for any number of reasons died.  Rodents will go back to their nests to die, so if there had been any “bait bars” or other types of poison in the RV to deter mice and they took the bait, they won’t die near the source, they have gone back to their hidey hole in a wall, mattress or corner cupboard.
  3. Do you notice outdoor debris scattered around?  Mice will bring in their food sources, so if you notice trails of little bits of debris from outdoors, that’s an indication there’s a nest somewhere.
  4. Holes?  If you have a huge RV, inspecting for holes and points of entry can seem like a nightmare.  Some people will do an inspection at night, using a flashlight shining from the inside out, and a helper outside looking for any light coming through.  Mice can get through an opening as small as a dime, so some RV owners even wrap their RV with plastic wrap around windows and doors to make intrusion that much harder.

A rodent infestation is the worst as it means damage and usually a lengthy clean-up, but if you inspect your RV frequently while it’s in storage, and if you start the engine when you can, that can help deter the little critters to find a quite abode elsewhere.

Natural Fun in North Florida

Florida State Parks Still Closed After Michael

The following State Parks are still closed (as of the date of this post) due to ongoing recovery efforts after Hurricane Michael.

St. George Island State Park in Franklin County

Florida Caverns State Park in Jackson County

Three Rivers State Park in Jackson County

St. Andrew’s State Park in Bay County  – Campground Remains Closed

St. Joseph Peninsula State Park in Gulf County – Camping Area Still Closed

Torreya State Park in Gadsen County – Camping Area Still Closed

 

If you’re traveling through Florida and have been affected by these closures, please contact us at Alliance Hill RV Park.  We’re just minutes off I-10, and we’re open for business.  We’ve been taking care of many of the contractors who are helping with recovery efforts, but we do have many sites available for the general public as well.  We will make every effort to accommodate every traveler during these months after Hurricane Michael.  God Bless Florida.

Run fresh clean water through all faucets once the bleach solution is drained.

Sanitize Your Freshwater System – RV

Is the water smelling funny?  Or maybe your noticing just constant lower-than-usual pressure?  It may be time to sanitize the water system in your RV.  It’s not difficult and can be done in just a few easy steps.  Refer to your owners’ manual or visit the manufacturer’s website for detailed instructions regarding your specific RV so you don’t do any damage or void any warranty in any way.  We’ve gathered the most agreed-upon steps to sanitize most freshwater systems in most RV’s.

  1. Turn off water heater and drain once it is cool and not pressurized.
  2. Open all drain lines and let as much water fully drain as possible.  This may include low-point drain lines as well as draining the water from the holding tank.  If you want to turn on the pump to force out as much water from the holding tank as possible, use caution and continue to watch so that you can stop the pump immediately when water stops flowing.
  3. Close all drains.
  4. The standard rule of thumb for bleach to water is 1/4 cup for every 15 gallons.
  5. Fill the freshwater tank to capacity, open all hot and cold faucets, and turn on the pump.
  6. Once water begins to flow through all pipes, turn off faucets and leave the system sealed with the bleach solution for 12 hours.  Some people even drive the motor coach or pull the trailer a little bit to move the water around within the system helping to ensure all pipes and surfaces make contact with the bleach solution.
  7. After at least 12 hours, open all drains and drain the bleach water completely from the system.  Make sure you’re not draining into an area where plant life could be harmed by the bleach cleaning solution.
  8. Refill the water tank, and run water through all faucets until the smell of bleach is completely absent.

Keeping your RV in good shape isn’t hard if you tackle these projects one at a time.  Part of the pleasure of the RV Lifestyle is enjoying taking care of your home away from home.

 

RV Living During Hurricane Season

Hurricane season in Florida and the Southeastern United States is generally from June through the end of September.  Coincidentally, these are the high months of travel for families, retirees and snowbirds alike.  So if you’ve got to weather a severe tropical storm or hurricane in your RV or at a campground, here are some precautions you can take to just try to keep your loved ones and your property safe.

The biggest threats are wind, flooding and lightning.  Here in Florida, we are the lightning capital of the world, and so lightning is a very real threat, however, if you are in any type of covered dwelling, and especially if there are trees around, a direct lightning strike is highly unlikely.

Flooding can be a major concern, especially during a tropical storm when rain is sustained for days and days and the ground is already saturated.  The best way to prevent any damage to your RV or camping equipment from flooding is to be PROACTIVE.  Make sure your site is on high ground, and create channels for water to flow PAST your site if necessary.  Even if you can create a small area where your vehicle and gear are safe from flooding, that will get you through the worst of the storm.

High winds are a very real danger for campers especially in heavily wooded areas.  If you can get to a solid structure, that’s the best plan of action to keep everyone safe.  If you’re concerned about vehicles and equipment, secure as much as you can either in a vehicle, RV or building, and move out from under trees where limbs can break in heavy winds.

Maintain current CPR certification and a well-stocked first-aid kit.  If there is a natural disaster that affects power and causes road blockage,  knowing how to handle a medical emergency may be the difference between life and death for someone in the campground with you.

Most campers and RVers are well prepared to live “off the grid” for a few days, but if you’re anticipating that you may run into bad weather during your travels, having a few extra canned goods, some sternos for cooking, and a solar water bag or other water purification system on hand is a good idea.

RV living and traveling isn’t always easy, and it isn’t always pleasant, but with a little forethought and keeping some basic first-aid and disaster supplies on hand can make unexpected (or expected) difficulties a little more bearable.

Microchip your pet may be a good option if you're on the road frequently.

Microchip in Pets for Traveling

If you’re on the road frequently, or for long periods of time, it’s likely you’ve got your best friend with you.  While we all seek to be especially careful to keep track of our naive and vulnerable pets, the worst case scenario absolutely can and does happen: your best friend gets loose and wanders off.  Having a collar and ID tag on the pet is a great way for the average person to know that the pet is not an abandoned stray, and is the simplest way for someone who finds your pet to contact you, but microchips are becoming a great plan B to have in place.

So how do microchips work?  Basically, a microchip ID is a small device which emits a radio frequency that is unique to an ID number assigned to your pet.  The chip also provides the phone number of the manufacturer of that chip, and that is where the ID number and pets info is registered.  Most vets and animal shelters have scanners that are universal and can read microchips from all major manufacturers.  Microchips can last up to 25 years, and because they are inserted just below the skin the subcutaneous tissue immediately begins to bond with the chip, making it highly unlikely the chip will migrate anywhere.

A collar with ID info is still the first line of defense against losing your pet, but if you and your best friend are on the road frequently, a microchip may be a good option.

 

RV Safety reminders

RV Safety

Part of the appeal of the RV life is visiting new places and seeing new things. It’s an Adventure! But as an RVer if you’re in a new place you might not be aware of local crime rates and problem areas. Sometimes being in a new place means you’ve ended up in the middle of trouble. Our RV is a comfort zone so it’s easy to forget to be aware of your surroundings.

Many campgrounds all over the United States are well cared for and safe but there are some instances where the local Walmart parking lot might be a safer option. Regardless of where you are parked for the evening some basic precautions are important.

Obviously, first and foremost is to lock your doors, windows, and storage compartments. If you have an electric step put it away and make sure it’s disabled. Put your curtains or blinds down so the inside of the RV is concealed. Items should never be left on the dashboard or windshield. Cables, charging cords etc should be hidden from view. If you’re boondocking make sure you are parked under a light with your door facing the front of the store. NEVER open the door to a stranger. Slide open a side window and stay put if you need to speak to someone at the door. Offer to/call the police for anyone who approaches the door asking for charity or assistance. Call 911 directly for any emergency. A police officer should hold up their badge so the number is visible. Usually they can point to the location of their car. Directory assistance at 411 could get you the number for the local police to verify the officers credentials. If you have a tow car with a panic button press it from inside the RV if anyone is outside messing with your vehicles. Camera monitors on the rear and side of the RV are extremely helpful in monitoring trouble and relatively inexpensive to install. Common sense should help guide you most of the way. Be safe!

RV Emergency Service Plans

RV Emergency Road Service

Do you have Emergency Road Service? For the cost it’s one of the most valuable items you can take with you on your travels. There are number of services each service company may provide and you’ll want to explore the options before you purchase.

When you purchase a new RV the manufacturer will sometimes provide Emergency Road Service from a program such as Coach Net. And some credit cards have Roadside Service as a perk (read more). Plans like AAA offer options with 100 – 200 miles of free towing while Good Sam has options for unlimited towing. The cost of these memberships typically range from $75 – $150 yearly so for the peace of mind you receive when traveling the value far outweighs the cost.

Emergency Road Assistance services help with common issues such as towing, flat-tires, lost key & lock out, and the oops, I forgot to fill up and now we’re out of fuel problem. Additional services might include Trip interruption help, emergency medical referral, or even roadside repairs. The best thing to do is to take your time and read through the options and services provided to determine which plan best fits the needs of your family. It’s important that you have clarification that the plan provides for the special needs of the RV and RVer.