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Category Archives: RV Life


RV Living During Hurricane Season

Hurricane season in Florida and the Southeastern United States is generally from June through the end of September.  Coincidentally, these are the high months of travel for families, retirees and snowbirds alike.  So if you’ve got to weather a severe tropical storm or hurricane in your RV or at a campground, here are some precautions you can take to just try to keep your loved ones and your property safe.

The biggest threats are wind, flooding and lightning.  Here in Florida, we are the lightning capital of the world, and so lightning is a very real threat, however, if you are in any type of covered dwelling, and especially if there are trees around, a direct lightning strike is highly unlikely.

Flooding can be a major concern, especially during a tropical storm when rain is sustained for days and days and the ground is already saturated.  The best way to prevent any damage to your RV or camping equipment from flooding is to be PROACTIVE.  Make sure your site is on high ground, and create channels for water to flow PAST your site if necessary.  Even if you can create a small area where your vehicle and gear are safe from flooding, that will get you through the worst of the storm.

High winds are a very real danger for campers especially in heavily wooded areas.  If you can get to a solid structure, that’s the best plan of action to keep everyone safe.  If you’re concerned about vehicles and equipment, secure as much as you can either in a vehicle, RV or building, and move out from under trees where limbs can break in heavy winds.

Maintain current CPR certification and a well-stocked first-aid kit.  If there is a natural disaster that affects power and causes road blockage,  knowing how to handle a medical emergency may be the difference between life and death for someone in the campground with you.

Most campers and RVers are well prepared to live “off the grid” for a few days, but if you’re anticipating that you may run into bad weather during your travels, having a few extra canned goods, some sternos for cooking, and a solar water bag or other water purification system on hand is a good idea.

RV living and traveling isn’t always easy, and it isn’t always pleasant, but with a little forethought and keeping some basic first-aid and disaster supplies on hand can make unexpected (or expected) difficulties a little more bearable.

Microchip your pet may be a good option if you're on the road frequently.

Microchip in Pets for Traveling

If you’re on the road frequently, or for long periods of time, it’s likely you’ve got your best friend with you.  While we all seek to be especially careful to keep track of our naive and vulnerable pets, the worst case scenario absolutely can and does happen: your best friend gets loose and wanders off.  Having a collar and ID tag on the pet is a great way for the average person to know that the pet is not an abandoned stray, and is the simplest way for someone who finds your pet to contact you, but microchips are becoming a great plan B to have in place.

So how do microchips work?  Basically, a microchip ID is a small device which emits a radio frequency that is unique to an ID number assigned to your pet.  The chip also provides the phone number of the manufacturer of that chip, and that is where the ID number and pets info is registered.  Most vets and animal shelters have scanners that are universal and can read microchips from all major manufacturers.  Microchips can last up to 25 years, and because they are inserted just below the skin the subcutaneous tissue immediately begins to bond with the chip, making it highly unlikely the chip will migrate anywhere.

A collar with ID info is still the first line of defense against losing your pet, but if you and your best friend are on the road frequently, a microchip may be a good option.

 

Fun activities to do with the grandchildren during your summer visit!

Summer with the Grandchildren

Here’s a great article of fun activities to do if you’re spending some time with the grandchildren this summer!  Especially if you’re traveling to see them, you’re likely going to stay for awhile.  The American Grandparents Association has come up with a list of 100 fun things to do with the grandkids during your visit!  Who says you can’t have a 2nd childhood?!

 

Rean About 100 Things to do with the Grandchildren This Summer

RV Safety reminders

RV Safety

Part of the appeal of the RV life is visiting new places and seeing new things. It’s an Adventure! But as an RVer if you’re in a new place you might not be aware of local crime rates and problem areas. Sometimes being in a new place means you’ve ended up in the middle of trouble. Our RV is a comfort zone so it’s easy to forget to be aware of your surroundings.

Many campgrounds all over the United States are well cared for and safe but there are some instances where the local Walmart parking lot might be a safer option. Regardless of where you are parked for the evening some basic precautions are important.

Obviously, first and foremost is to lock your doors, windows, and storage compartments. If you have an electric step put it away and make sure it’s disabled. Put your curtains or blinds down so the inside of the RV is concealed. Items should never be left on the dashboard or windshield. Cables, charging cords etc should be hidden from view. If you’re boondocking make sure you are parked under a light with your door facing the front of the store. NEVER open the door to a stranger. Slide open a side window and stay put if you need to speak to someone at the door. Offer to/call the police for anyone who approaches the door asking for charity or assistance. Call 911 directly for any emergency. A police officer should hold up their badge so the number is visible. Usually they can point to the location of their car. Directory assistance at 411 could get you the number for the local police to verify the officers credentials. If you have a tow car with a panic button press it from inside the RV if anyone is outside messing with your vehicles. Camera monitors on the rear and side of the RV are extremely helpful in monitoring trouble and relatively inexpensive to install. Common sense should help guide you most of the way. Be safe!

RV Emergency Service Plans

RV Emergency Road Service

Do you have Emergency Road Service? For the cost it’s one of the most valuable items you can take with you on your travels. There are number of services each service company may provide and you’ll want to explore the options before you purchase.

When you purchase a new RV the manufacturer will sometimes provide Emergency Road Service from a program such as Coach Net. And some credit cards have Roadside Service as a perk (read more). Plans like AAA offer options with 100 – 200 miles of free towing while Good Sam has options for unlimited towing. The cost of these memberships typically range from $75 – $150 yearly so for the peace of mind you receive when traveling the value far outweighs the cost.

Emergency Road Assistance services help with common issues such as towing, flat-tires, lost key & lock out, and the oops, I forgot to fill up and now we’re out of fuel problem. Additional services might include Trip interruption help, emergency medical referral, or even roadside repairs. The best thing to do is to take your time and read through the options and services provided to determine which plan best fits the needs of your family. It’s important that you have clarification that the plan provides for the special needs of the RV and RVer.

enjoying wildflowers RV living

Bloom Spotting in North Florida – RV Lifestyle

If you’re traveling along I-10, or any of the by-ways of North Florida, anytime between April and September, you’re in for a beautiful showing of wildflowers. As you cruise along in your RV or pulling your camper, you’re going to want to put down that book or cell phone and enjoy the show. Here are some of the blooming beauties you will experience as you travel North Florida this summer.

Pine Barren Frostweed: This perennial offers clusters of 5-petaled yellow blooms about 1 inch each at the end of shrub-like stalks. From March through June, you’ll see these hearty little beauties along many North Florida roadsides.

Rose-Rush: This Florida native is best appreciated close up. It’s delicate dusty-purple petals are serrated at the ends, blooming from the end of just one long stalk. Their stamens curly-q around each other in a delightfully delicate manner. One would think they were right out of wonderland.

Blue flower Butterwort: Amazingly detailed, this bloom is actually variegated with veins of light purple running through a darker purple blossom. A carnivore, it’s stamen looks remarkably like a little caterpillar, and it blooms on a single stalk growing from a light-green cluster of 3 inch long leaves, which could easily be mistaken for a weed in one’s garden. Needing very little nutrients, and enjoying the sandy, well-draining soil of Florida, these little beauties bloom happily along the interstate winter through spring.

Want to see more? You can visit to see images of wildflowers other travelers have shared at https://flawildflowers.org/whats-in-bloom/. If you have a great picture you would like to share, you can email it to photos@flawildflowers.org along with the location where you took the photo, and it will be added to the page!

Controlling moisture in your RV.

Reducing Condensation and Moisture in Your RV

RV Living is truly one of the most free and pleasurable lifestyles available. We’re so blessed to live in a nation that spans an entire continent, and have a friendly neighbor to the north that allows even more variety as we travel. But RV living is not all carefree. Living in an RV has it’s own set of challenges, which can vary by climate, but one constant is controlling moisture.

Here are a few tips that can help you control moisture levels in your RV.

1. Always use fans when cooking and showering. Cracking the windows during cooking and showering isn’t a bad idea, but running the overhead fan(s) is a must.

2. Don’t air-dry your clothes inside. This may be tricky if you’re experiencing inclement weather for several days in a row, but it’s worth it to go to the local laundry mat and use the dryers in order to ensure that not only your clothing dries completely, but that the air in your RV remains dry as well.

3. Install better window insulation, especially if you’re traveling from colder climates. This is a bit of an investment, but worth it to keep dry air in and moisture out

Controlling moisture in your RV.

Controlling moisture in your RV.

4. Use DampRid or a de-humidifier. Mold loves moisture, so this is a must to maintain a safe living environment.

5. Monitor indoor moisture levels. Hygrometers are the devices used to measure moisture, and they typically are paired with another weather sensor like a thermometer. Prices for a device like this can range from $10 to $35 depending on the features you choose, but a hygrometer is easy enough to obtain via an online retailer.

RV Living is the epitome of freedom and enjoyment, and keeping your RV clean, dry, safe, and comfortable is easy once you know what to do!

The pots and pans you really need in your RV kitchen

RV Cooking Essentials

RV living is partly about living a minimalist lifestyle. But when it comes to enjoying great food, you don’t want to sacrifice your favorite meals simply because you can’t fit everything that a kitchen may have. We’ve helped pare down the pots and pans you REALLY need to these basic essentials.

With so many kitchen tools available on the market, it’s hard to know what you actually NEED; what’s actually worth taking up that valuable cupboard space.

Most cooking experts agree, the pots and pans you can do the most work with, and which will be the most versatile are:

8″ non-stick skillet
10″ stainless steel skillet
Large stainless steel stock pot
12″ Cast Iron Skillet
4 quart stainless steel sauce pot
Colander
With these items you can do everything from fry an egg and prepare stir-fry for four, to simmer delicious chili and traditional cornbread for eight. Most of these items can serve dual purpose, like a glass bowl over the sauce pot can serve as a double boiler, and the cast-iron skillet can serve as baking pan for hearty beer and corn breads.

That myriad of selection at the local kitchen specialty store may be shiny and pretty, but if you get creative, you can do just as much in your RV kitchen as you could in your home, but with fewer tools and an organized kitchen. Which kitchen essentials can you not live without? Let us know!

Beautiful Native Florida Wildflowers

Freshening Air in Your RV Naturally

If you or a member of your spouse has respiratory issues, you know that using aerosol air-freshers isn’t always the best choice, especially in the small space of an RV. Also, the concern about the danger of burning candles or incense, or spilling liquid wax is magnified in an RV, but we found some great ideas to help you freshen the air in your RV naturally!

Here’s some of our favorites:

Put coffee grounds at the bottom of a new garbage bag in the kitchen to freshen that typically stinky area, and to keep kitchen odors from spreading throughout the RV.

Dried herbs and flowers including rosemary, lavender and roses are a great way to provide a subtle hint of outdoor freshness in your RV and the subtle, natural smells can help you feel relax and clear-headed.

Did you know that houseplants actually help clean the air? They DO! Wow, just having a few great indoor houseplants can help increase the amount oxygen and fresh air in your RV, and they provide a touch of beauty too!

Simmering potpourri is a great way to “personalize” your air freshening. Rummage through your refrigerator and spice rack, and put some of your favorite flavors in a pot of simmering water. Using your favorite scent combinations like apple and cinnamon, oranges and cloves, or mint and lemon, you’ll be surprised how much you’ll enjoy the natural scent of ingredients you already have right in your kitchen.

Vinegar is a great way to get rid of food smells and combat bacteria at the same time. A solution of white vinegar to four parts water in a spray bottle can be spritzed into the air to combat strong odors like onion and garlic.

What’s your favorite way to naturally freshen the air in your RV? Let us know!

RV lifestyle and Tiny Houses are all the craze

Tiny Houses and Renovated RV’s

Whether motivated by environmental impact concerns, embracing the minimalist lifestyle, or just because of nostalgia, everyone’s getting in on the renovated RV/Bus craze! Most of us have known for some time, however, how fabulous the RV lifestyle is, but now that the whole world is realizing it, that’s not a bad thing!

Recreational vehicles (RVs) are synonymous with road trips and summer. Whether you’re taking a cross country drive in a giant motorhome with all the amenities of a real house, or camping out in a renovated van, these vehicles epitomize freedom and travel — and they’re getting more and more popular.
Today, RVs — be they trailers or converted vans — have seen a resurgence in popularity based on nostalgia. You can even stay in a renovated Airstream trailer via Airbnb.
Keep reading for a look into how RVs have changed over the years.
http://www.thisisinsider.com/iconic-rvs-evolution-2017-7